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Spotlight on Meru

Spotlight on Meru

This programme started as a feeding programme for children living day and night on the streets in Meru Town. The project is now based in the Meru Catholic Consolata Mission (CCM) primary school. 

Extended family members and foster carers were found to care for the children and food and clothes were provided to assist and support them. When free primary education was introduced in Kenya some years ago, the children were all able to go to school and continued to be fed at lunchtime. Uniforms and books were provided and the children thrived. 

Mercy has been the social worker at this project for three years and in this time has made huge differences to the project, to the children and their carers. She has a strong management board around her, including the headmistress of CCM school (which most of the younger children attend) and a young man who is a graduate of the Tharaka project.

On Saturdays there is a full programme of singing, games, education and work on the shamba (vegetable patch) – and a cooked lunch!  

Extended family members and foster carers were found to care for the children and food and clothes were provided to assist and support them. When free primary education was introduced in Kenya some years ago, the children were all able to go to school and continued to be fed at lunchtime. Uniforms and books were provided and the children thrived. 

Mercy has been the social worker at this project for three years and in this time has made huge differences to the project, to the children and their carers. She has a strong management board around her, including the headmistress of CCM school (which most of the younger children attend) and a young man who is a graduate of the Tharaka project.

On Saturdays there is a full programme of singing, games, education and work on the shamba (vegetable patch) – and a cooked lunch!  

Mercy says “All my children are supported by Karibuni to acquire education, school uniforms and two meals every day. Currently, we have 12 children in nursery, 51 in primary school, 5 in secondary school, 5 in vocation training centres and one who is about to join, 9 in the universities and 20 alumni. In summary we have 82 school going children and 20 who have already completed”.

Henry was raised in a home where the local illegal brew was made and sold as a means of income. Inevitably most of the family drank it, and Henry said they were all ‘drunkards’. While still at primary school, Henry was rescued by the project and went to live there, sleeping in the storeroom and being cared for by the cook, James, and his wife, Francesca. He got his degree in Economics and Statistics at university and is currently looking for work.

Frankline was also taken in by the project. He spent much of his youth living on the streets in Meru, his family having broken up. Even when at secondary school he did his homework at school before going to sleep in the streets. 

James, the cook at the Township project, took pity on him too and let him sleep in the storeroom. Despite this adversity, he did so well in his exams that he qualified for university, studied Economics, got his degree and is now working in management in a hospital while self-funding his Masters degree part-time.

Earlier, he wrote: “I am so grateful to the entire Karibuni Trust fraternity for making my dreams come to reality. Am thankful to you for financing my education from standard three ….to…University. It has been difficult for me but through your help and encouragement I am where I am. I thank you all for being there for me in the hour of need.”.

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